Thursday, July 03, 2014

Where have all the bloggers gone?


It is four months since Protect the Pope went into 'a period of prayer and reflection' at the direction of Bishop Campbell, someone recently asked me why tend not to post so often as I did, and I must say I have been asking the same question about other bloggers.

The reign of Benedict produced a real flourish of 'citizen journalists', the net was alive with discussion on what the Pope was saying or doing and how it affected the life of our own local Church. Looking at some of my old posts they invariably began with quote or picture followed by a comment, Benedict stimulated thought, reflection and dialogue, an open and free intellectual environment. There was a solidity and certainty in Benedict's teaching which made discussion possible and stimulated intellectual honesty, one knew where the Church and the Pope stood. Today we are in less certain times, the intellectual life of the Church is thwart with uncertainty.

Most Catholics but especially clergy want to be loyal to the Pope in order to maintain the unity of the Church, today that loyalty is perhaps best expressed through silence.

81 comments:

viterbo said...

It's too obvious, 'where have all the bloggers gone, long time passing...' to me it's the ABCs of attritional war - make 'em feel like there's no point.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=mr-SPS-hERo

Fr Simon Henry said...

A trend I too have both noticed and experienced. Very aptly put.

Sixupman said...

Very well put!

M. Prodigal said...

It is a bit scary with what some cardinals and others--sometimes even the Pope--are saying. And there is confusion as well. And like my grandmother used to say, "If you cannot say anything good, don't say anything."

There is also a persecution within the Church against those who hold fast to the timeless teachings and traditions and opening proclaiming them puts one on the radar for persecution (from a superior).

John Newbery said...

Where have all the bloggers gone..... could be an undiscovered tune from Peter, Paul, and Mary !

Ceile De said...

It's the problem of what I call the current hermeneutic of incoherence.

nickbris said...

If this means that Francis is less popular than Benedict then there is something seriously wrong.

Most ordinary Catholics were brought up to accept the Pope as leader of The Holy Catholic Church,we never even discussed or even wondered if He was right or wrong or what he wore was good or bad.

It would seem though by what we read that Pope Francis is the most popular Pope in History,he is more normal and not aloof.

Jacobi said...

Yes Father, I think a lot of us have been asking that. Of course it may be just the summer and the holiday season – but I doubt it.

The cancellation of “Protect the Pope” was a resounding victory for those factions in the Church who don’t like straight talking. That generally means the Relativising and therefore Secularising factions which are now seen to be much more widespread within the clergy, as well as the laity, than at least I suspected.

The liberal/Relativists have had a new lease of life under Francis who they think, wrongly, (some laity want to be loyal to the Pope also, you know), will change Church doctrine on the old three issues, the Real Presence, the Redemptive nature of the Crucifixion, and the Ordained Clergy – all Protestant heresies by the way.

And their main line of attack is that we must all, (presumably have a “right” in their terms), receive the Blessed Sacrament, at all Masses, whether we are having it off, with whoever, or not.

Rubbish!

If, by the way, their hopes are in any way realised, we are in to a second “Reformation”

jptheo1978 said...

I am only one person, but I blog at least 2-3 times a week. There is always a point and there is always hope.

Fr said...

I think a good many webloggers are uninspired these days. Life seems to be so ....grey, dull.

And Rome is rather a long way away. News of papal utterances and initiatives - even novelties -can take weeks, months to reach us via our superiors' preferred channels, especially by second class post.

Meanwhile, there are lots of cat videos to watch on the tube thingy.

Mulier Fortis said...

Amen, Father Blake.

Jacobi said...

Oh dear, so much for rattled-off comments. Well obviously I meant that changing those doctines were the Protestant heresies!

Father, scrub this if you think I am being pernickety!

Daniel J said...

Father, you've got it spot on. I rarely even comment on blogs nowadays, as generally I think it is better to keep my thoughts to myself. The papacy of Pope Benedict XVI was one of reawakening a sense of Catholic identity. Now it seems we are in sleepier times....

gemoftheocean said...

1. Pope Frankie is depressing. The more I ignore him the better I feel.
2. My own life is so chaotic right now I tend not to want to take others along for the roller coaster ride.
3. But I HAVE been missing blogging and need it as a release and am thinking of just doing more.
4. I tend to post things on FB now that in the past I would have posted on my blog. It's quicker.
5. I HATE how the powers-that-be tweaked the blogger application.
6. Anyway, I need to get back into it I have noted the same trend as well.

Dorothy B said...

I am waiting for the Synod on the Family and what it may or may not unleash, whether of itself or because of those who latch on to this or that phrase to push their own agenda. It helps that I can manage to read some of the Italian-language blogs. Some great soldiers of the Faith there. Apart from that, for the most part, I keep a cool head, and watch, and think many thoughts which I prefer not to commit to writing.

Joe Potillor said...

Karen's definitely right on one. The uncertainty of things, (Communists are closet Christians didn't help, the constant insults, the persecution of the FFI, etc) I've been a bit busy so I haven't gotten around to much commenting. But I will say "who am I to judge" were 5 of the most damaging words ever said by Pope Francis, and context or not has deflated much of the good work that has been done under the pontificates of JPII and Benedict XVI

Anita Moore said...

I myself am down to about one post a month on my own blog, and I comment on other blogs fairly infrequently these days. It is partly a function of things that have been going on in my life, including a promotion at work and the accompanying new responsibilities. But I also have felt the need for more silence. Perhaps it is a sort of regrouping.

Adulio said...

It is never loyal to be silent in the face of confusion (even when it comes from the Pope).

polycarped said...

"...today that loyalty is perhaps best expressed through silence."

Yes, that is fast becoming my policy as well. I just wish that the Holy Father would find a little more room in his day for silence too...

What's fascinating is how so many non-Catholics/non-Christians have become so taken by Pope Francis. I think it's because they think he is telling them things they want to hear rather than telling them things they need to hear and because, from a worldly viewpoint, they welcome his dumbing down the office of the Supreme Pontiff to become something more ordinary. So the outside world loves him but the Church itself is disintegrating. Strange and scary times.

Simon Reilly said...

It's a bit difficult to be loyal to the Pope when there are two of them.

New Catholic said...

Perhaps.

As for us, our posts and our readership statistics have increased considerably in the past 15 months, thanks to all who keep visiting us, including from this blog.

Best regards,

NC
Rorate caeli

Sadie Vacantist said...

People are getting bored with the medium. Besides modern gadgets do not lend themslves to long comments. I use a nexus and the keyboard is not suitable. Moreover, many have grasped the futility of being keyboard warriors and slowly accepting the futility of debate.

F1 is the first conservative Pope of my lifetime. He affirms the immediate past or at least seeks to conserve it. The crappy liturgies are the new norm and not some temporary aberration to be corrected by him or any other senior cleric. In a bizarre way, he is bringing to a conclusion the post-conciliar era and we seem to be entering a period of almost humble resignation. Like Pope Benedict, the bloggers have simply lost the power to continue.

English Catholic said...

Some of the blogs are a little less busy than they were, but others (Fr Z, Supertradmum, Hilary White, various others) are as active as ever.

In any case, we have cause to be optimistic. Whatever idiocy comes out of the hierarchy, the long-term momentum is very much in favour of tradition.

NBW said...

Silence is golden.

gemoftheocean said...

polycarped: excellent observation re: "dumbed down office" of the papacy. As a fellow blogger said "...it's like he doesn't realize he not in some podunk backwater in Argentina anymore" or words to that effect. Frankly, I don't think he's doing much good as far as standing firm for the faith in ways that are clear to the world out large. He's supposed to ALWAYS make the church teachings clear and at best he does D work where A work is needed. And he needs to stop persecuting the EF Form of the mass and those proponents. I am FINE with a well executed NO Mass myself, but the EF form is doing a lot of good and people ought to get out of their way and stop putting up roadblocks.

Katalina said...

Benedict was not normal and aloof? Really? I guess when you are on the cover of even Rolling Stone Magazine that's great right? Wrong. The pope is not supposed to be loved by the whole world. Christ said so himself. Benedict was normal and not aloof as you can see bit he as shy. At least you knew where he stood on matters unlike our current Pope.

Lynda said...

The silence, in this context of diabolical disorientation and persecution, is deadly. Many of those who know, and normally uphold the objective truth, have been intimidated into silence by the powers of the atheistic, anti-Catholic, anti-morality agencies and fora of state and interstate bodies, as well as, increasingly, of the Church. Shockingly, following the example of the secular powers, and the Church officials and leaders on a large scale, this has now filtered down to the local community and family level. Those who refuse to bow down or acquiesce to the new regime - wherein intrinsic evil is promoted and objective good, maligned - are mercilessly persecuted, defamed and marginalised. Catholics loyal to the unchangeable Deposit of Faith and morals are being made to suffer in all areas of life (and, sadly, this is increasingly coming from within the Church hierarchy, as well as outside the Church). The corrupt leaders of the Church are facilitating this persecution as they refuse to defend the objective moral truths and Christ's commandments, and the Faithful being persecuted, but rather compromise with, or give support to, the persecutors. For the most part, the persecuted cannot look to bishops, priests or Church agencies for help, defence, never mind leadership. These are the rotten fruits of the great apostasy. As Robert de Mattei has so insightfully commented: "Motus in Fine Velocior". Blessed Michael, defend us in battle . . .

Ma Tucker said...

4802The level of disorientation will escalate and people will need these blogs to be fully operational. Not to sneer at the pope but to explain and restate Catholic doctrine and point out errors. I can't imagine anything more loyal to the Papacy than that work.

Francis said...

I would say it's a mixed picture. The advent of Pope Francis has had a definite effect. He does not have the same intellectual appeal to traditionally-minded bloggers as Benedict did and I agree that a large proportion of bloggers feel that discretion is the better part of valour, and have reined in, either by posting fewer items or by switching off the combox.

American bloggers are still going strong, however: Fr. Z., Fr. Dwight Longenecker, Creative Minority Report... There is also the rise of the blog-of-blogs (e.g. BigPulpit) which collect the best articles from different blog and media sources. You don’t need to visit so may blogs if someone else is collecting the best posts for you.

In the UK, most priest bloggers have been much less active since Protect the Pope was silenced, but other British lay bloggers have gone up a gear (e.g. LMS Chairman). Fr. Hunwicke is back with a vengeance and the Catholic Herald comment boxes are as lively as ever.

Now that Damian Thompson has left the Daily Telegraph, I would be very surprised if he does not start blogging on religious matters independently. He may yet be the spark that reignites the UK Catholic blogging world, especially as he has plenty of stories to tell about past attempts to gag him. He is also completely unintimidated by the hierarchy.

Restore-DC-Catholicism said...

I too have noticed the lamentable silence of fellow bloggers. I consider myself to be a loyal Catholic who loves her church. It is precisely because of my love for the Church that I will not be silent about my concerns, even of those concerns are caused by missteps of His Holiness himself. See http://restore-dc-catholicism.blogspot.com/

gemoftheocean said...

All true Ma Tucker, but it would be nice if a certain high church official at 41.9040° N, 12.4530° E "got with the program."

Amy Welborn said...

Or maybe we're just...speechless?

Jacobi said...

Well, if Frs. Ray, Tim, Simon and others are nobbled, (and don’t tell me it hasn’t occurred to you), no need to despair.

There’s always Voris you know!

And I suspect they would meet their match in Fr Z, mark you?

bobbrookes said...

"We have become orphans" (Lamentations 5:3)
At the moment it is very easy to feel isolated, abandoned and alone.
However, we wait quietly in the certain Hope that Christ will never abandon His Church.
There is reassurance that all here love their Catholic Faith dearly.

Liam Ronan said...

The great silence of these days:

"When the Lamb broke the seventh seal, there was silence in heaven for about half an hour. And I saw the seven angels who stand before God, and seven trumpets were given to them...
The first sounded, and there came hail and fire, mixed with blood, and they were thrown to the earth; and a third of the earth was burned up, and a third of the trees were burned up, and all the green grass was burned up." Rev. 8:1-2; Rev. 8:7

"As I told you, if men do not repent and better themselves, the Father will inflict a terrible punishment on all humanity. It will be a punishment greater than the deluge, such as one will never seen before. Fire will fall from the sky and will wipe out a great part of humanity, the good as well as the bad, sparing neither priests nor faithful. The survivors will find themselves so desolate that they will envy the dead. The only arms which will remain for you will be the Rosary and the Sign left by My Son. Each day recite the prayers of the Rosary. With the Rosary, pray for the Pope, the bishops and priests." Our Lady of Akita - 13 October 1973

Physiocrat said...

Here's a suggestion. There is a mass of liturgical music on Youtube. You could do worse than paste in the Introit or some other piece of music relevant to the Sunday or feast day, with a short comment. Eg last Sunday could have been Tu es Petrus by Palestrina, or the introit Nunc sciovere.

That way people would get to hear what they ought to be able to hear at Mass but are very lucky if they are actually given the opportunity.

Liam Ronan said...

By the way, I was heartened that part of the message of Our Lady of Akita has been translated thus: "Each day recite the prayers of the Rosary...".

So I can be grim-faced or expressionless while I 'recite' my prayers, it seems. Mary knows that God reads the intentions of the heart; not the contortions of the countenance.

And as we are all her children, Our Mother knows how short a child's attention span may be.

catholicsensibility said...

"Benedict stimulated thought, reflection and dialogue, an open and free intellectual environment."

If so, it never translated to the blogosphere. I saw more bitterness, bile, name-calling and open hostility. If we have less of that these days, Deo gratias.

John Vasc said...

Yes, I agree that there seems to be more radio silence. German historians describe the artists and intellectuals who stayed in pre-war Germany but were increasingly alienated from its politics and society and descended into public silence, as the 'Inner Emigration'. Perhaps something similar is happening in sections of the Church? I certainly notice more reticence than there used to be. Walls have ears etc.
Looking at it positively, perhaps we became rather over-dependent on having the Church's teaching expressed by Pope Benedict, leading from the front, as it were. Now we are reminded that the Pope is the successor of St Peter, not the Head of the Church, and the unchanging body of Catholic doctrine is there for us all to study, research, make sure we understand, so we can accurately pass on to our children and grandchildren 'what we have received of the Lord'.
Perhaps Patristics, Thomist theology, Scripture-study, and even strictly-taught classes in Christian Doctrine and the Catechism might undergo a renaissance of interest...

Fr Michael Brown said...

Well said Father. It`s hard to feel inspired these dys.

Liam Ronan said...

Very very astute observations and advice, John Vasc!
The only difficulty is that notwithstanding there are 2000 years of doctrine and infallible teachings to impart we must nonetheless compelled to closely follow the utterances of the present Bishop of Rome so as, unfortunately, to be prepared to rebut or even counter certain of his present unorthodox utterings and shocking pastoral praxis if we are to ourselves catechize the true Catholic Faith.

Jacobi said...

I remember vaguely some years ago at my selective local authority Catholic school being told by my RE teacher, something like “ you boys are lucky to receive a sound Catholic education but with that comes responsibilities”. No doubt my mind was on other things and I didn’t really consider or therefore understand what he was talking about. Now I do.

There is a great confusion in the Church at present. Yes we can resign ourselves in trust, or preserve a dutiful but disagreeing silence, or just give up.

I suspect the advice my RE teacher would give now is something like “get a grip you lot. I’ve taught you what you need. Get out and defend the Church and its Magisterium, loudly - from the rooftops if necessary. And keep a copy of the CCC up your jersey”!

Pablo the Mexican said...

"...5 So Gideon took the men down to the water. There the Lord told him, “Separate those who lap the water with their tongues as a dog laps from those who kneel down to drink.” 6 Three hundred of them drank from cupped hands, lapping like dogs. All the rest got down on their knees to drink.

7 The Lord said to Gideon, “With the three hundred men that lapped I will save you and give the Midianites into your hands. Let all the others go home.” 8 So Gideon sent the rest of the Israelites home but kept the three hundred, who took over the provisions and trumpets of the others..."

Your blog, having weathered the attacks of the Evil Ones, is still standing.

So are all of mine.

We have made you and honorary Cristero Padre, after seeing you have given your heart to our Divine Master.

With the assurance of my Holy Rosary prayers for all your good work in the vineyard of the Divine Master, I remain yours truly in Jesus and Mary Immaculate.

¡Viva Cristo Rey!


*

pie said...

I stopped blogging around the time Pope Francis returned from Brazil and started actively appeasing "the world".

(BTW accusations of cumplicity with argentinian dictators stopped more or less at the same time).

I have been spending much more time in prayer and doing all those (formerly catholic) semipelagian stuff the Pope abhorrs. I'm trying to discern why God allowed this pontificate to see the light of day.

I'm also spendind more time reading church history. Its very "enlightening" (i.e. Pope John XXII, Pope Honorius I, Pope Vigilius, ...)

In short, I decided to batten down the hatches and wait 2/3 years for the results of the double synod on the family.

If the synod directly or indirectly contradicts the clear teachings of Jesus I won't stick around.

Liam Ronan said...

@Jacobi,

Again I salute your sound advice. However, to get on with any sound Catholic evangelization of our brethern we might, for the time being, be guided by a famous quote uttered by The Wizard of Oz in the 1939 film of the same name:

"Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain!"

torchofthefaith said...

Some thoughts...

1. Shock and Awe: Soon after the 'Big Interview' we spent a deal of energy articulating an orthodox, catechetical defence of the Holy Father's words. The succession of troubling words and acts which followed that interview were rather overwhelming. Then some English bishops jumped on the 'Kasper-bandwagon'. Perhaps Lawrence England described it best in March as a situation of 'shock and awe'.

2. Prudence: Some of our readers are not yet Catholics, others are enquirers and some are neophytes. To avoid confusing or discouraging them, we tend to focus on orthodox events and teachings. It can be very discouraging to spend time explaining why one does not receive blessings from Anglican ministers, only to see Pope Francis doing just that on TV. To highlight such things on our news/blog page could only confuse such enquirers and make us look 'more Roman than Rome'.

3. Playing with pitch can get you covered in it: A few months ago, we got so bogged down in defending the Faith from ACTA and other local dissenters - beyond the view of the internet - that we lost our focus on Christ and His peace. We found refocusing was aided by highlighting on more positive things on the blog.

4. No Back-Up: Connected to the above is the sad truth that there is little back-up these days for orthodox Catholics who stick their necks out (on and off-line) for the Faith. Simply put - time is then needed to regroup.

5. Choosing Battles: My uncle was a tail-gunner on a Lancaster Bomber. Often the Luftwaffe would sit just outside the range of the tail-gunner and use superior fire-power to take them out and then proceed to rake the rest of the aircraft. Sometimes it was safer for tail-gunners to just sit quiet and guide their pilots into cloud cover. When you are out-gunned and surrounded, it is prudent - at times - to keep your eyes wide open and conserve your energy for better opportunities. In a long war, there will be plenty of other times for such action.

6. Ultimately though, Lynda is right: Silence in this context of diabolical disorientation is deadly. Perhaps some are keeping their powder dry for the October Revolution...

In Christ
Alan and Angeline

Jacobi said...

I’m shocked Liam. That’s no way to refer to the Holy Father. What will Fr Blake think?

On second thoughts before you send anyone out to evangelise, maybe a copy of “ The Penny Catechism “ up their sleeve will do. I mean the CCC is a bit bulky?

Now let’s stop this. I have to take Herself shopping!

Genty said...

Reading the comments on this and other blogs I am reminded of the various stages of bereavement.

Supertradmum said...

Hey, I am still here--living in under-techland

The problem is that the bloggers are weary of the lack of response to real issues from their readers and too much infighting.

And, for me, blogging is not a hobby but a ministry, which means one does it whether one feels like it or not

gemoftheocean said...

I never thought I'd see the day when "Is the pope Catholic?" anything other than a rhetorical questions. I am rather relieved that at least bears still do what they do in the woods. At least that is not in question, other than rhetorical. I have to keep repeating to myself the bible verse re: "The gates of hell will not prevail against it." I just hear a lot of rattling like a force 5 Hurricane against those gates at the moment. If the church survived Avignon et al...this too shall pass.

Liam Ronan said...

@Jacobi,

Sorry if my earlier analogy was totes inappropes. It wasn't meant to be denigrating, but rather merely amusingly cautionary.

My apologies to Fr. Blake if it was beyond the beyonds.

Nicolas Bellord said...

Pie: You wrote: "If the synod directly or indirectly contradicts the clear teachings of Jesus I won't stick around."

The synod will not change the clear teachings of Jesus because it has no power to do so. Whatever it says infallibility will not attach. If it purports to contradict the teachings of Jesus we need to hanh on in and contradict it loudly. But I guess it will be orthodox but I hope it will not be too wishy-washy in doing so.

I also wonder how long "a period of prayer and discernment" has to last. Perhaps the good Bishop Campbell will let us know.

Jacobi said...

“merely amusingly cautionary”

@Liam,

And so was my response. And somehow, I don’t think Fr Blake was upset. I rather think/hope he was amused?

Now that’s definitely it!

Liam Ronan said...

Poor Jacobi!

As Michael Corleone once said:

"Just when I thought I was out... they pull me back in."

Fuhgeddaboutit, Compare! Peace.

John Simlett said...

As a very simple layman who usually lurks hereabouts with little to add, I find all this to be a bit confusing. Here are a few things I can’t quite get my head around:

I find one here who struggles with the presence of ‘two Popes’ but not, I hope, with the notion of a trinity.

Others advocate the catechism, but sidestep, “Can the Pope err in what he teaches?”

One focus seems to be on the politics of religion, and the many factions within a ‘catholic’ church – which seems a contradiction-in-terms.

I can see that there is a great many academics here who will sniff at my lack of understanding of the finer points being made, but at least allow me to be the expert in one part of the heavens: I was RAF aircrew for 25 years. The flying tactics of ‘torchofthefaith’ and the notion of a tail gunner (who points to rear) steering the aircraft (which tends to fly forwards, up or down but never backwards) into the safety of clouds is confusing.
Perhaps I’m being too technical, so to simplify: suppose the Holy Father is flying the aircraft and we are the tail gunners. Are we in danger of wagging-the-dog? Should we trust the pilot to fly us to safety or should we (a) mutiny (b) bale out?

gemoftheocean said...

Liam: Should we all draw straws for the honor of putting the horse's head in with "himself?" If it works Pope Frank will be be removing himself out of "Our lady of the Airport" and doing a TLM in a more appropriate venue ... with sweat running down his face. Hey, whatever it takes.

viterbo said...

You're kidding, Gem. Bears still do what they do in the woods?! We have to convene a council and put a stop to this outdated nonesense - immediately! and we definitely have to introduce fake-fur as the Ordinary Raiment of the average bear since that other stuff is just beyond un-pc and simply a silly and shallow fashion.

Pelerin said...

I am beginning to wonder if it might be better to stop reading the Catholic blogs for the present. Too much news is becoming depressing.

Today I have learnt of a Swiss nun who agrees with euthanasia saying that 'Dieu est pour la liberte' (God is for freedom.) And an ex-Catholic who is a former Priest leading a retreat in a monastery.

What is happening to our beloved Church?

torchofthefaith said...

Dear John

Thank you for your amusing comment.

I have sometimes been accused of back-seat driving, but my uncle never was!

Of course, as you can see, I never did say that the tail-gunner steered the aircraft.

I did speak of the widely known practice whereby a tail-gunner would inform the pilot of the presence and location of enemy aircraft in order - when this was the most prudent course of action - to guide them away from it.

The tail was not wagging the dog, but the crew were listening to each other and working in harmony.

I would never suggest mutiny or bail out from Holy Mother Church - neither did I.

I did share some thoughts about the times when sitting quiet can be prudent. This was the context and purpose of the tail-gunner analogy.

I also said that there are times to speak. When catechumens and enquirers become confused by events in the Church, speaking out clearly becomes paramount to avoid them reaching for the parachutes. This is true even - and perhaps especially - here in the back seats.

God bless.

viterbo said...

Blogs are better value than sky. I would never have known that the mafia had been excommunicated, but not really, without them - and the story takes an interesting turn:

http://rt.com/news/170836-italy-church-parade-mafia/#.U7pnw6VVJ88.twitter

I wonder if commoners who pay tribute to a mafioso will be next in line for an excommunication that isn't an excommunication.

Barry said...

Could it be that we are happy with what is happening?

Catholic Mission said...

July 7, 2014
Asking the Franciscans of the Immaculate to accept Vatican Council II with an irrational inference violates their conscience : laws in Italy

http://eucharistandmission.blogspot.it/2014/07/asking-franciscans-of-immaculate-to.html#links

John Vasc said...

“Can the Pope err in what he teaches?”
John S, that question is not in the Catechism. I think maybe you've mixed up two different questions. CCD 100 is "Can the *Church* err in what she teaches?". CCD 93 is "What do you mean when you say the Pope is infallible?" (Ans: "that the Pope cannot err when as Shepherd and Teacher of all Christians, he defines a doctrine concerning faith or morals, to be held by the whole Church.")
No new doctrinal definition has occurred yet during this papacy.

J said...

I have a humble blog (in spanish) and I used to enter two or three posts every week.
Now I have stopped writing for almost a month. Just don´t know what to say.
I was thinking to write something about being shellshocked. But i did not.

Physiocrat said...

We could always come to the defence of Catholic Social Teaching which is coming under attack from the pseudo-libertarians including the Austrian economists.
here

viterbo said...

A good article on the completely non-binding non-dogmatic nature of that pastoral council that now rules the Church with an iron rod:

"Prior to, during, and in the aftermath of Vatican II, the popes have seen fit to reiterate the non-definitive nature of the Council; their words presumably so widely familiar by now that there is no need to repeat them here. "No part of the religious teaching is to be understood as dogmatically declared and defined, unless such declaration or definition is clearly known to have been made. (cf Can. 1323 Code of Canon Law, 1917)" This canon served to inform the “Explanatory Note” that is recorded in the Vatican II document Lumen Gentium:“In view of the conciliar practice and the pastoral purpose of the present Council, this sacred Synod defines matters of faith or morals as binding on the Church only when the Synod itself openly declares so.” For the record, the Second Vatican Council made such an open declaration precisely zero times."

http://www.harvestingthefruit.com/vatican-ii-asking-all-the-wrong-questions/

How can a Franciscan be asked to take an oath to non-binding non-dogmatic and therefore not infallible defacto freemasonries suggested in the 1960's? Just asking. This becomes madder by the minute. Or maybe that's just me.

Physiocrat said...

@viterbo - What is all this about masonic conspiracies and V2? I have been hearing this since 1975, and not just from Catholics.

I am not denying the possibility but where is the hard information? It all seems too tenuous and speculative. You wouldn't hang anyone on that kind of evidence.

Jacobi said...

@ Viterbo

“The truth is that this particular Council defined no dogma at all, and deliberately chose to remain on a modest level, as a merely pastoral council; and yet many treat it as though it had made itself into a sort of super dogma which takes away the importance of all the rest.”

Benedict.

This has to be said again, and again and shouted from the rooftops.

Catholic Mission said...

July 9, 2014
Lay Catholics can end the Franciscans of the Immaculate, SSPX problem

http://eucharistandmission.blogspot.it/2014/07/lay-catholics-can-end-franciscans-of.html#links

Ann Frost said...

Have those speaking/writing disrespectfully of the Pope forgotten that he is Christ''s Vicar?

viterbo said...

physiocrat - I used 'defacto' to avoid the 'conspiracy thing'. If there's one thing that's plain freemasonic thought is VII thought and now catholic thought - that being universalism and indifferentism. Read Pike, he made no bones about Freemasonry aiming to overcome Rome. He also told his brethren not to bother trying to get a Jesuit to take masonic oaths as a Jesuit 'cannot be bound to any oath.'

"the encyclical Pacem in Terris ('Peace on Earth' by John XXIII) is a vigorous statement of Masonic doctrine.. we do not hesitate to recommend its thoughtful reading." (quoted from the 'Masonic bulletin', the official organ of the Supreme Council of 33rd Degree Scottish Rite Masons in Mexico, 'May 1963', in 'The New Montinian Church' by Fr. Joaquin Arriaga, pp.147-148)"

Plus Pope Pius VII, Pope Leo XII, Pope Gregory XVI, Pope Pius IX, Pope Leo XIII, Pope Pius XI, all wrote warnings about freemasons conspring against the Church:

http://www.novusordowatch.org/wire/conspiracy.htm

Catholic Mission said...

July 9, 2014
Ecclesiastical blackmail?
http://eucharistandmission.blogspot.it/2014/07/ecclesiastical-blackmail.html#links

Lynda said...

There must be respect for the Papacy. There must be assent to the Deposit of Faith, as upheld by the authentic Magisterium of the Church. If a pope says or does things that oppose the Doctrine of the Faith, he must be opposed, as a necessary result of our obedience to the unchanging, unchangeable Deposit of Faith, and of our baptismal vows.

Physiocrat said...

I think it time to keep our heads down and get on with the practice of the faith as best we can. This will blow over.

There are other aspects of the Catholic Faith to be defended. Open attacks on the Pope are going to be unproductive or worse.

Restore-DC-Catholicism said...

It is NOT an "attack on the Pope" to point out errors. Indeed, we must point them out to remind ourselves and each other that the Pope can err in matters of prudential judgment and that these errors need not be embraced as magisterial teaching. It is often said that silence implies consent. How very true here. This is no time to waver. If we feel tired or discouraged, we must run counter to those feelings and fight (and blog) all the more. We must do violence to our own lethargy, not coddle it.

Ann Frost said...

I have lived during the reign of seven Popes and have witnessed among the "faithful'" a growing disrespect for the Person of Jesus Christ in the Blessed Sacrament and for His Vicar on earth. This can't end well.

Dymphna said...

The Catholic mommy bloggers are still here. The devotional bloggers who write about the psalms or the Divine Office are still here. The bloggers who write about their own parish news are still here. The people who write about the pope have a dilemma because there is very little happy to say but papal doings are only a part of the Catholic blogosphere.

Matthew Livermore said...

I'm still blogging! I have just written a post on tradition and the future of the Catholic Church: http://golgonooza.blogspot.co.uk/2014/07/tradition-and-future.html

Catholic Mission said...

Where have all the bloggers gone?

Thursday, July 17, 2014
NO DENIAL FROM THE USCCB: IRRATIONALITY BEING USED IN ALL THE U.S DIOCESES IN THE INTERPRETATION OF VATICAN COUNCIL II AND THE CATECHISM OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH
http://eucharistandmission.blogspot.it/2014/07/no-denial-from-usccb-irrationality.html#links

hughosb said...

Amen.

Kristin LA said...

As Saint Paul said: "I am astonished that you are so quickly deserting him who called you in the grace of Christ and turning to a different gospel--not that there is another gospel, but there are some who trouble you and want to pervert the gospel of Christ. But even if we, or an angel from heaven, should preach to you a gospel contrary to that which we have preached to you, let him be accursed."

Catholic Bloggers -- preach the gospel openly and joyfully!! No one --not even the Apostles-- not even an angel -- has the right to change it.