Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Pope Benedict's Health a Concern

The health of Benedict XVI has dramatically diminished in the last two weeks, Paloma Gómez Borrero wrote Tuesday night in the Spanish paper El Mundo. According to her, Benedict suffers from something – quote – “very severe”. She adds: “We won't have him with us for very much longer”.



39 comments:

EFpastor emeritus said...

May the Lord make His face to shine upon him.

Supertradmum said...

prayers and looking at the Italian news for some more on this...

Rhoslyn said...

:'( Say it isn't so.

Ignatiuspaul said...

There was a comment made on EWTN when Pope Benedict left Rome for Castel Gandolfo by a german writer who had seen the holy father in recent times that he may not return to Rome alive ! I thought at the time that perhaps he had some knowledge of the presence of a serious condition. He said that the Pope's hearing and sight had all but gone and that he was losing weight.

Doodler said...

Why not leave the poor man alone and stop speculating?

Supertradmum said...

Update
Edward Pentin ‏@edwardpentin 3m
FrLombardi says B16 not suffering from illness, "his problems are age-related", after Spanish author claims his health is rapidly worsening.

CE User said...

Doodler, so that people will pray for him.

diff said...

Dear Doodler,

This is concern for one we Love, It pains me to think of our beloved pope emeritus sick or suffering.

MaynGod grand him every grace and blessing

TomG said...

Doodler: because we love him.

Cosmos said...

What a sad day that will be! My family continues to pray for the "Old Pope," as we call him.

NBW said...

May the Lord Bless Pope Emeritus Benedict.

vetusta ecclesia said...

It was widely reported last year that a Vatican official had leaked that HHBXVI would be dead within the year

Nancy Danielson said...

Will someone outside The Vatican please check in on our Holy Father who should be in a hospital, not in seclusion?

viterbo said...

'Turn, O my soul, into thy rest, for the Lord hath been bountiful to thee. For he hath delivered my soul from death: my eyes from tears, my feet from falling. I will please the Lord in the land of the living.' Ps 114

Ken said...

I felt inside that he may have a serious health condition. I am praying that God allow him enough time to see how much he truly is loved. He, in my opinion was worn down with a close circle that was working against him; not with him. So sad but he has made his tremendous contribution to our Church and his example will be remembered until the end of time. So many signs.. his visit to the tomb of St. Celestine and so forth. There was a reason for his election to the pontificate and perhaps this will be revealed. He continued the work of Bl. John Paul admirably -- I was so sad when he resigned but inside felt that this brilliant man made his decision with some supernatural sign from God above. God knows everything and yet, he chose Holy Benedict to serve us for almost eight years. There is a heavenly plan and God does indeed write straight with crooked lines. God bless you Holy Benedict and it is my hope that you remain with us for some time... Pope Francis, as any successor could use the example and camaraderie..

Physiocrat said...

We shall miss him. BTW, that woman's English is terrible. Can't they get someone who speaks standard British English?

mark said...

Is it me? I looked at the video, but I failed to hear or see any item relevant to the story about BXVI's health.
PS - I think we may pray for BXVI whether his health is failing or not. Let's do it.
But let's not gossip about his health.

Fr Ray Blake said...

Mark,
See now, I think Gloria changed the video, which they sometimes do.

Pablo the Mexican said...

"...We shall miss him. BTW, that woman's English is terrible. Can't they get someone who speaks standard British English?...

British English is no longer spoken in the world.

I don't think they speak it even in Britain.

English is just a tool for various peoples to communicate; soon Chinese will be used instead of English, then maybe you can start a club with tea and crumpets to help keep it from going to extinction.

Maybe what really bothers you is the "God bless you" the lovely lady gives us?


*

gemoftheocean said...

It would not surprise me in the least if Pope Benedict really was in his last days. [I remarked at the time of his resignation, that I thought a serious problem was being held back.] For some people, depending what they have, being "in the hospital" isn't going to do a darn bit of good if what they have is incurable. I'm sure nursing care (assuming it is needed) is right at hand in more familiar surroundings for him to make him more comfortable. For those of us who have lost loved ones, we know that sometimes, they do NOT want people hovering and fussing over them. They need contact and friends to visit. But they don't necessarily need the milk man to come in and cry over them.

Tony Flavin said...

Doodler is right, if the emeritus wanted us to know, something would have been announced officially.

If it's true, he's entitled to his privacy. If it;s true his illness is about him, not about or desire to pray for his health.

JARay said...

I now read that this report of illness has been denied by Fr. Lombardi

Fr Ray Blake said...

I think her English is absolutey charming.

Jeremiah Methuselah said...

@ Physiocrat

Listen, that lady speaks excellent English and pronounces names in foreign languages perfectly. Why on earth should she speak what you call "standard British English ?" What, pray, is that ?

You cavil, you are completely wrong and you are completely out of order. Obviously time hangs heavily on your hands.

Independent said...

In our sick society one hopes that the death of such an excellent person, when it occurs, will not be marked by rejoicing on the part of those who were offended that anyone might have the temerity to disagree with their ill informed opinions.

Amfortas said...

Her English isn't that bad. At least she isn't using a Goon Show accent like the reporters on Rome Reports TV.

Physiocrat said...

@Jeremiah Methuselah said...
"Listen, that lady speaks excellent English and pronounces names in foreign languages perfectly."
Yes I agree

"Why on earth should she speak what you call "standard British English ?"
Because if, in the context of a radio station, you want to be regarded as convincing and reliable, that is what you do. You employ native speakers of whatever language you are broadcasting.

"What, pray, is that ?"
The type of English used by the BBC for new broadcasting is Standard British English and known as Received Pronunciation. Very light regional variations are considered acceptable for newsreading. If you broadcast with a heavy regional or foreign accent you will be type-cast as a "character".

My reaction will be a widespread one, and it does not inspire confidence in whoever is sending out the broadcast. I am sure there must be plenty of young visiting students who would be happy to read the news in their own languages. It shows a lack of professionalism.

gemoftheocean said...

Physiocrat: How insular and parochial of you. Does it even occur to you that "gloria.tv" perhaps doesn't broadcast to just the little old UK -- which has a MINORITY of the English speakers on the planet? Are they supposed to have separate broadcasts with "Standard Canadian"/"Australian"/"US"/"New Zealand" and British accents to be "credible?" "Standard British" may be native to some, but it sure as hell isn't "standard" to Americans, who are now the majority share-holders of native English speakers.

Be grateful the woman was grammatically correct. EVERYONE, including you, has an accent. You would be right to carp if she was ungrammatical. THAT is when people can and do discount what someone is saying if they are speaking in a professional capacity. Unless someone has an excellent ear and learns from childhood, very few can achieve a "perfect native accent." So something like that shouldn't be held against them. Unless, of course, you are some sort of snob. In which case, carry on.

At any rate, BBC are "the pants" given they are such little weasels caving in to broadcasting a snippet from a song just because some of their fellow left winger scum gets off on a certain party's death. Same BBC would not dare to broadcast same should anti-monarchists celebrate with the same song when Queen Bess shuffles off this mortal coil. The BBC would chicken out like the cowards they are. So they are hardly paragons of virtue. As nice as RP sounds (my husband had that accent) there is more than one way to skin a cat.

Lisa Mock said...

I hope this is not true I am so sad, to think our poor old pope is said to be so unwell. God grant him peace and I am doing some serious praying that this is just "paper" talk, god bless him he is dearly loved

viterbo said...

Latin, Greek, Hebrew...the three great tongues of antiquity (accents aside) - the verbal lifeblood of the Jerusalem in which Our Saviour the Truth in time lived and breathed . Pope Benedict was given about as much deference on the recognition of Truth vouchsafed to the consecrated from God in 'antiquity' as a cast off wife fading in the shadow of...something new. If there's an effulgence, inn time, of crawleybumlicks, from the consecrated who, during Benedicts reign, scoffed of a Sunday, preached against, abused the Mass, and still do, preached ghandi, dalalamas, scourges of the east and a lot besides whilst poo pooing the 'what was holy yesterday is holy today' of his reign..shame shame shame...grow a Catholic conscience.

Jeremiah Methuselah said...

Physiocrat said...

“Because if, in the context of a radio station, you want to be regarded as convincing and reliable, that is what you do!”

You were actually doing quite well until you wrote this nonsense and I realised it’s a total send-up.

Congratulations ! I must admit you hade me fooled for a little while. Thanks for injecting some humour into a truly sad topic.

Physiocrat said...

Given the gravity of the announcement, an appropriately grave tone of voice is required. Given that there is no longer agreement on what is an appropriately grave tone of English, and tone of voice is everything in English, which is scarcely even a single language, then surely it would be better to read in Italian, or better still, Latin, and have text sub-titles?

Amfortas said...

Gem, you remind me of Mrs. Thatcher.

Konstantin said...

Great story, and the Pope seems to like obedience ;-)

Physiocrat said...

Here is the news in Latin It can be done.

kfca said...

I just saw this translation of an article about Benedict XVI posted on Rorate Caeli, and it is always a pleasure to share such good news - Benedict's growing strength, his forthcoming birthday celebrations on Tuesday, the anniversary of his baptism on Wednesday, his continuing studying and writing and his planned return to Rome:

"..an article from Carriere della sera titled "Emeritus Pope’s Health Problems Age-related".

Fr Lombardi on difficult days after resignation: “Not ill”. Ratzinger’s brother Georg in Italy for emeritus Pope’s eighty-sixth birthday. Despite the Twitter-borne news of his death and reports in the Spanish media that he was suffering from a serious illness, the news filtering out of the Lake Albano-side papal residence is that, although he suffers the aches and pains of old age, Benedict XVI is getting over his retirement shock. Spokesman Fr Lombardi ruled out any “specific illness”, explaining that the emeritus Pope’s “health problems are those related to age”. Admittedly, Benedict XVI looked tired and thinner at his historic meeting with Pope Francis on 23 March. Pictures from Castel Gandolfo showed a haggard face with a drained expression, giving rise to rumours and speculation. Benedict XVI had explained the reasons for his renunciation of the Petrine ministry, reiterating at his last audience on 27 February that “in the past few months, I have felt my strength fading”. When the renunciation came into effect and he began to live “hidden from the world” at 8 pm on 28 February, something that happens to lots of people happened to him.

Professor Attilio Maseri, the cardiologist of Pope John Paul II and Queen Elizabeth II, notes that retirement shock is a matter of routine: “It particularly affects individuals who had great responsibilities, let alone a pope. And it is all the more natural and understandable that it should occur in the face of a decision of such importance”. It’s hard at first − stopping all of a sudden and after an eight-year-long pontificate − but then comes a bounce-back effect and recovery. Benedict XVI’s cardiac problems are common knowledge but, as Professor Maseri explains, “in cases like this it’s a matter of the brain, not the heart”. It’s also a good sign when the individual stays intellectually active, as Joseph Ratzinger has.

The emeritus Pope took a large stock of books with him to Castel Gandolfo, starting with Aesthetic Theology by Hans Urs von Balthasar, the great Swiss theologian with whom he founded the journal Communio in 1972. With Benedict XVI in his apartment are Archbishop Georg Gänswein, the prefect of the pontifical household, who divides his time between the lakeside and the Vatican, four Memores Domini assistants and, significantly, Birgit Wansing, a consecrated lay affiliate of the Schönstatt institute, his long-serving secretary and reputedly the only person capable of deciphering his tiny pencilled handwriting. In other words, the emeritus Pope continues to study and to write.

Now, his eighty-nine year-old brother Georg has arrived with his assistant Sister Christine. The little household is complete and ready for Tuesday’s birthday, followed by the feast of St George – the name day of his brother and of Archbishop Gänswein – on 23 April. Benedict XVI is thriving in the milder weather that the Castelli Romani area is at last enjoying. He gets up only a little later than he did in Rome, reciting the breviary and lauds before breakfast. He reads the newspapers and then it’s time for his books, reflection and prayer. Lunch is followed by a rest and a walk in the gardens, reciting the rosary until dinner, the TV news, more reading and prayers before bed. Those in the know say he is gradually recovering and getting ready to return to the Vatican “at the end of the month or in early May”. Work on the former monastery where the emeritus Pope will reside is almost finished. Waiting for him are the boxes containing his private documents – personal papers and study texts – as well as his beloved library.
by Gian Guido Vecchi

Physiocrat said...

Good news, then. Let's all hope and pray that Benedict has a few good years to enjoy his retirement.

jack smith said...

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Katalina said...

I wish most of us had just taken Benedict at his word when he first announced that he was resigning on February 11 of this year. Why did we not? He asked all of us after his election of the faithful "If I do something you don't agree with or understand than please TRUST ME" I trusted his reason since he made his decisions but as this whole fiasco many other (even the Catholic Media)did not. What a great shame.