Sunday, September 04, 2011

New Translation?

Not much reaction, not as messy as I feared: most people used the hand outs we prepared.

Few commented on them, no one negatively, one person enthused about the beauty of the Gloria and how it seemed eaasier to say, but only one.

I was just so glad to implement them, though the nasty paperback interim Missal is quite undignified and difficult to use.

19 comments:

Patricius said...

My local church (and at least one prominent church in London) did not implement the new translation. What say you to that, padre?

Mac McLernon said...

I think the new translation knocks spots off the old one - and the phrasing isn't as difficult as the scare-mongerers like to make out.

Glad you had a positive response!

georgem said...

Ditto Patricius.

James Blythe said...

Patricius, I believe that the Archdiocese of Westminster gave its priests a greater degree of flexibility over implementation between now and Advent than other dioceses did. That might explain the situation, if you were north of the border...

PIUSXXX said...

So good to see that there is an alternative to the awful Confiteor and that you can use the doctrine-lite Apostles’ Creed. I guess this is all part of the great Benedictine reform??

Gigi said...

I thought all Catholic Churches were uniformly adopting the new missal this weekend??
I prefer the use of words such as "adored" in direct relation to the Latin . I agree that the phrasing isn't that difficult - just new! Mostly, I find it more emphatic and quite beautiful.

Asteroid said...

We used it (at least mainly) but did have a few moans from the priest about 'difficult' words like consubstantial, about how awful it was to use the same word as the Americans which just wouldn't happen at an Irish bingo hall, and about someone's criticisms in The Tablet.

Never mind. At least we're implementing it and as the priest said, we'll just have to put up with it. Or in my case be happy to have it. Roll on November when we can all at last buy the new Missals.

RJ said...

I found myself saying "And also with you" automatically. I guess it will wear off after some practice with the new translation.

Sadie Vacantist said...

Zero enthusiasm in our kneck of the woods.

Fr Seán Coyle said...

I'm curious about the interim missal. Does it include the full texts of all Masses until Advent? Is it only the new translation of the Ordinary of the Mass that is used with the old translation of the rest?

Why spend so much money on books that are to be used for less than three months?

Fr Ray Blake said...

Fr Sean,
I haven't examined what isn't in it, yet. I will do so.

There was nothing for the Sacred Heart on the 1st Friday, nor are the musical setting of the Prefaces.

Fr Ray Blake said...

The New Missal is supposed to be implemented "in toto" by 1st Sunday of Advent.

Presumably many priests are going to do this very gradually, partly because they haven't quite gathered a change was taking place or haven't made plans over the holiday period.

facta non verba said...

The new translation was introduced with barely a hesitation in our parish. We were invited to follow the text of the Farnworth SUNDAY MASS BOOK "slavishly" and everybody did.
Furthermore, the choir had miraculously doubled in size and gave a convincing lead in the new chants. The Gloria held together rather better than the clapping version we had become so accustomed to. Reactions were positive.

Delia said...

Slightly strange hybrid in my parish, because the new Missal hasn't arrived yet. So maybe some parishes are waiting until they get theirs to make the changes wholesale.

I really like the new translation.

Anonymous said...

Father dear, surprised to hear you moaning about the quality of the interim missal. It is quite adequate for the short interim period. This is not like you to be cranky. I think it is a real help to ease us into the new trans.As for those who complain about the price, well goodness me, what can you get in your local bookshop for £10 pounds? A junk novel you will pass on to the charity shop within a week!

The new trans. is just wonderful, the vast array of material produced by CTS and others is just so helpful. Come on Resurrection People!! Rejoice and be glad. LeAve the nay saying to thosr jaded cranks who seem to want to damage the Church. Cheers. Michael

Fr Ray Blake said...

Michael,
I don't complain about the cost, it is the size of the print and lay out, for example the consecration is spread over two pages in some instances and one has to turn the page for the Mystery of Faith.
It might have been better to have had a binding that would stay open and flat, a basic requisite for a liturgical book.
But all that is temporary, for a few months, and actually you can download your Missal if you have the energy.

For my part I am grateful, for it, so we can ditch the paraphrased translations.

Sixupman said...

The Northern parish, which I happened to attend, provided a missal Latin on one side, New Translation on the other - perfect for purposes of explanation to the congregation.

However, this leads to the question, albeit rhetorical, why did we not just use the Tridentine Missal and allow use of the vernacular for where appropriate?

Of course, lay participation!

Simon Ho said...

Fr Blake,

If I'm not mistaken, the pagination of the actual altar/chapel missals is identical to the pagination in the introductory missal. So you might have to endure awkward page turnings - but at least you will have tabs to help with the actual altar missals.

Fr Coyle,

The Introductory Missal contains the propers for the 23rd to 34th Sundays/Weeks of Ordinary Time, All Saints, and the Feast of Christ the King; all the Prefaces that can be used from now till Advent but without music (e.g. for Sundays, Common, BVM, Saints, Dedication of Church, the Dead etc), solemn blessings for Ordinary Time and All Saints, Rite of Sprinkling (to replace the Penitential Act) and the Order of Mass (including 4 Eucharistic Prayers). It has one ribbon and no tabs. I added another ribbon and tabs for my parish.

Fr Seán Coyle said...

Thank you, Simon Ho.