Sunday, September 26, 2010

Gordon Bennett Cup

Just a thought... balloons filled with gas and left to float in the breeze high in the sky, which eventually come drifting down to earth and are not seen again... there must be an ecclesiastical equivalent to the Gordon Bennett Cup.


I am just thinking of all of those boundary pushing theologians who sailed so high in the thirty or so years after the Council whose writings now sit in a deflated pile, unread on an obscure library shelf somewhere.

8 comments:

Pedant said...

Unfortunately, Father, while their writings may now sit unread on a library shelf, those who devoured them in the thirty or so years after the Council are now in high positions in the Church. The damage caused by these writings is alive and (un)well snd probably will be for some time to come. After all, Corpus Christi college was closed down many years ago but the damage inflicted by that seat of learning is still very much around, especially in the RE courses being taught in our schools. Is it not time, in this new era following the Pope's visit, that parish prists take back control of the local schools and insist that these 1970s ideas are removed fom the text books and orthodox books put in their stead.

JARay said...

Reading the comment from "Pedant" I was immediately reminded of Corpus Christi College. I well remember some of the nonsense which that college promulgated and I was delighted at its demise. I cannot remember the names of the luminaries who dazzled at that college but that is perhaps due to the fact that the light emitting therefrom was hardly Catholic and has since sunk into the oblivion which it merited.
I also noticed that the CTS still publishes the old "penny" catechism but it is not totally as expansive as once it was. The present Catechism of the Catholic Church is fine but it is too expansive for schoolchildren to sit and learn, as I learned when I was a boy at school.

Chris said...

Pedant...which 1970s ideas are you talking about? Surely religion books used in Catholic schools are approved by the bishops. If so how can the content of these books be unorthodox?

Also pastors of parishes (at least here in the States) have ultimate control of local Catholic schools unless they are run by religious.

Just wondering what 1970s ideas you have in mind.

Laurence England said...

I went to an Abbey recently in the South East of England. They were still selling them on their bookshelves.

Didn't see many people buying!

mundabor said...

Strange.
Whilst reading your beautiful comparison I was immediately reminded of our current crop of bishops.

We'll have to wait a couple of decades before those balloons drift down to earth again.

M

Sharon said...

The present Catechism of the Catholic Church is fine but it is too expansive for schoolchildren to sit and learn, as I learned when I was a boy at school.


JARay Questions from the Green Catechism can be used by teachers as a take home question to be learned by the students after a more detailed presentation in the classroom.

The Compendium of the Catechism of the Catholic Church is much easier to understand than the CCC and I have heard that a Catechism for the Catholic Church for teenagers is being produced.

RJ said...

Unfortunately, their influence is still pervasive.
Most authors seem to suffer an eclipse after their death, only to find renewed popularity with later generations, so it may not be enough to let sleeping dogs lie. There is a need for their ideas to be examined and the faults traced rigorously to their source, so that they can be properly debunked.

shane said...

"I also noticed that the CTS still publishes the old "penny" catechism but it is not totally as expansive as once it was."

This may help:
http://url.ie/7ogv