Tuesday, August 19, 2008

Saint me me

Received from Mac, a "me me"


"If you should pass from our presence, what picture of you shall we use for your saint's card, should you be so elevated, and of what do you want to be patron?"!



Mac should know, "the road to hell is pathed with the skulls of priests."

"From him who is given much is expected."


An old monk I knew, used to write to newly ordained priests saying, "Consider that you are most likely going to go to hell, you could be thought a good priest if go alone, rather than dragging others with you!"


I can't think of an image for a card, I had always thought a tomb with an image like this one, (is it from Wells Cathedral?) possibly holding a scroll with "ora pro me" scratched on it would be good.

5 comments:

John said...

What a dreadful thing to write to any newly ordained priest!
No doubt Hell has a goodly share of priests but to suggest that majority would be going there is absurd!
I am of the opinion that the vast majority of the Western World's deceased have in fact ended up there because of the secularism which is such a characteristic of that population. I envisage Our Lord saying again and again "Amen, I do not know you". As Jesus himself said "God is not mocked" and the Western World is so adept at mocking God.!
Such may well not be the fate of those from other parts of the world.

JARay

Fr Ray Blake said...

JARay,
It wasn't quite so dreadful as his letters were always well written and illustrated, by a cartoon or three. I remember being shown one illustrating this phrase with his abbot leading him and his community to hell with monastery's new pigs, which were causing trouble!

alban said...

I think 3 quotations from the Catechism are appropriate.

"God predestines no one to go to hell; for this a willful turning away from God (mortal sin)is necessary, and a persistence in it until the end." (1037)

"Although we can judge that an act is in itself a grave offence, we must entrust judgement of such persons to the justice and mercy of God." (1861)

"Whoever blasphemes against the Holy Spirit never has forgiveness but is guilty of an eternal sin (Mark 3:29). There are no limits to the mercy of God, but anyone who deliberately refuses to accept his mercy by repenting, rejects the forgiveness of his sins and the salvation offered by the Holy Spirit. Such hardness of heart can lead to final impenitence and eternal loss.' (1864)

Point 1: Freedom means we can say "No" to God for all eternity.
Point 2: Even though we may judge an act as grave, we cannot judge the soul of the person committing the act.
Point 3: Notice that, when expounding on Mark 3:29, the Catechism states that (a) there are no limits to God's mercy (b)there needs to be a deliberate refusal of offered forgiveness (c)that this can (the Church does not use the words 'will' or 'does') lead to eternal loss.

This is why that, whilst teaching it is indeed possible for us to say "No" to God for all eternity (i.e. Hell), the Church has very wisely refrained from ever saying that that there are any human beings actually in Hell. If the Church does not make such statements, then we would be well advised to follow that example.

gemoftheocean said...

Wow!! :-D

John, relax. I propose that when Fr. Ray passes shuffles off this mortal coil, he'd be a good patron saint for those seeking humility! Also patron saint of opera fans, refugees, lute players, and soup kitchen workers. Far from Fr. Ray mocking, he's obviously aware that he's considered by God to be responsible for the leadership of his flock, to remain true to the faith and shepherd the flock entrusted to his care. This is an awesome responsibility and Fr. Ray is humble enough to know that being a servant of the servants of God is one that should be approached with fear of judgment! [In other words, he's harder on his own conscience than on yours!]

Mac McLernon said...

I also appreciated the humour of this post...

...and the photo is a salutary reminder of our fate (at least of our mortal remains) Very much in the spirit of St. Alphonsus!